Advice to Leaving Certs of 2013

I know what you’re thinking. I’ve been there. Many before you have been there. You’re already worrying tirelessly about the Leaving Cert. Your nails have been chewed down so far that they hurt, and rescue remedy has become your only true friend.

Lol, JK! The truth is that right now, the Leaving Cert does seem like something so far away that it can’t even be seen yet. It’s understandable that you’d feel that way. You do have nine months, and it seems like a very long time. So I’m going to give you some advice on how to face this Leaving Cert head on, whilst keeping your sanity and your happiness intact.

  1. Study now! – This is probably going to be the most unpopular piece of advice for a Leaving Cert student, so in advance, I’m sorry. And I also know that about 85% of you won’t heed this advice. Still, you should take heed of it. When I did my Leaving Cert last year, I made a terrible error. For the first term I didn’t really do that much work, believing that it could wait. I did do a bit of studying, I kept up with the workload, but I wasn’t doing nearly enough. I regretted it a lot when, after Christmas, I was plunged into several weeks of sickening cramming for the infamous Mocks/Pres. It took the Mocks for me to realise that the Leaving Cert wasn’t that far away at all, it was just around the corner. I don’t want to stress you out, but the truth is that nine months isn’t a very long time. Start the work now, and by the second term you’ll be well on top of things. You’ll have a lot of the course covered, and you won’t have to go through the panic your heedless friends will go through.
  2. Study Timetable – I know, yet again, unpopular advice. But it really is incredibly helpful. Looking back on my Leaving Cert year, I don’t know how I would have gotten by sometimes without a study timetable. The best thing to do is write out all your subjects, decide on the amount of hours you’re doing a week, and divide up those hours between your subjects. You don’t have to divide the hours up evenly. It’s probably a good idea to give some extra hours to the subjects that you struggle with, but it’s also important to give extra time to the subjects that you really love and want to do really well in.
  3. Research college courses: A very important one for the first term in particular, because in the second and third terms, you just won’t have the time to do the research. Get all the information you can on the area you’re interested in and colleges that have courses in that area. Then read up about it on the internet, in the prospectus. Go to open days too, and that’ll give you a great idea of whether or not it’s the right choice for you. Don’t feel stressed if you have no idea what course to do, you’re in the same boat as nearly every single other Leaving Cert student. How the hell could you know what you want to do if you’ve never done it before? If you can, try contacting somebody in the profession you’re interested in and ask for advice, or if you can find the time, try and get work experience. If you’re still at a loss, take out a pen and paper, and write down all the things you like and the things that interest you. If you find that you’ve written down something like the function of the human mind, then Psychology could interest you. Or if you’ve written down I love to read perhaps English Literature is the course for you. Don’t listen to anybody who tells you not to do a course because there are no jobs in that area. The recession will not last forever. By the time you graduate, the situation will surely have improved greatly, and even if it hasn’t, you’ll probably be happier unemployed with a qualification you loved getting than being employed in an area you hate.
  4. Stop with the internet and the television: Yet more unpopular advice, and I am really sorry to have to give it. The chances are that this year, your internet and television habits will suffer. You’re better off looking at it now. Do you come in from school and spend three hours in front of the telly and then another two on Facebook? That’s going to have to change if you want a good Leaving Cert. Look at what you watch on television – is any of it available at a later hour, or online? If so, you’ll do better to watch it that way. The worst thing you can do while studying is take an hour break to watch Grey’s Anatomy. The chances are you won’t go back and finish studying afterwards. For the internet, you could ask your parents to disconnect the modem and hide the plug somewhere, or even more drastically, take the battery out of your laptop and get someone to hide it for you. At least then the temptation is gone!
  5. Don’t over-do it – Despite everything, keep yourself grounded. At the end of the day, the Leaving Cert is only an exam. It may be important, but it’s really not as important as people make it out to be either. Yes, it’s important you try your best, but if you find that you’re studying at two o’clock in the morning then you need to re-evaluate the importance of this whole thing. Sleep and relaxation are just as important as keeping on top of the workload.
  6. Relax – Set some time aside at the end of your evening studying just to chill out, watch television, hang out with your family or friends – something, anything other than studying. Going for a walk at the end of a long study session can do you the world of good and leave you feeling refreshed and happy again. Get a lot of sleep, too. You will get tired, because studying is exhausting. Don’t let yourself get sick from not getting enough rest.

So that is my advice. Leaving Cert students of 2013, I salute you, and wish you the very best of luck for your Leaving Cert and for the future.